Keynote lecture 2015

Adventures in Bibliography:

exploring Edo-period book histories

Dr Ellis Tinios

Tinios

8 August 2015 (Saturday) – 15.30-17.00

Emmanuel College – Queen’s Building – Harrods Room

 

Abstract:

Edo-period books provide a rich resource for scholars in numerous disciplines. Direct engagement with the books themselves often throws up unexpected and seemingly in intractable bibliographic challenges. This lecture will examine some of those challenges through the publishing histories of selected titles and suggest strategies that will enable researchers to use this material with confidence.

 

Ellis Tinios is Honorary Lecturer in History at the University of Leeds, faulty member of the Rare Book School, University of Virginia, and Visiting Researcher at the Art Research Center, Ritsumeikan University. His primary research interest is the illustrated book in Japan, 1603-1912. His work encompasses bibliographic issues; the economics of book production; marketing, advertising and sale; and book design.

His recent publications include: Understanding Japanese Illustrated Books: a short introduction to their history, bibliography and format, co-authored with Suzuki Jun (Brill, 2013); Japanese Prints: Ukiyo-e in Edo, 1700-1900 (British Museum Press, 2010, reprinted with revisions, 2014); and ‘Japanese Illustrated Erotic Books in the Context of Commercial Publishing, 1660-1868’ in Japan Review: Journal of the International Research Center for Japanese Studies (No 26 (2013) Special Issue: Shunga).

He is also the leading teacher for our Intensive Workshop of Japanese Textual Scholarship.

 

Everyone is welcome!

 

Because of space constraints please contact Dr Laura Moretti (lm571@cam.ac.uk) if you are interested in attending this lecture.

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